Archive | Running Shoes

Running Shoe Counts

Each year Lava Magazine has been publishing the running shoe counts from “Kona”, the Ironman in Hawaii. They just published the 2015 data from David Jewel at Shoe Ranger of the shoes worn in the marathon leg. I have been putting into table form their data from over the years: Just a couple of notes: […]

Continue Reading 0

The Minimalist Index for running shoes

One of the problems with running shoe research is that different running shoe manufacturers use a different set of design features to try and achieve the same effect. For example, there are a number of different design features that could be considered attempts at ‘motion control’. If a study uses a shoe with one of […]

Continue Reading 7

Arch height and running shoe prescribing …all is not as it seems?

The prevailing paradigm for a long time for the prescription of running shoes was based on concepts like the amount of “pronation”, the related issue of arch height and foot print analysis. The accumulated evidence, despite the widespread nonsensical writing about “overpronation” (and fueled by a healthy dose of the Dunning-Kruger effect) pointed to this approach […]

Continue Reading 0

Running Shoes Can Control Motion

There certainly has been a lot of comments in recent years about how ineffective that running shoes actually are supposed to be at controlling motion and I have sort have gone along with that as that is probably what the preponderance of data was showing. I did take a brief look at this earlier this […]

Continue Reading 0

The Re-emergence of the Minimal Running Shoe

This just turned up in my alerts “The Re-emergence of the Minimal Running Shoe” …. hmmmm, I was puzzled. I thought the opposite was happening and maybe I had missed a swing back the other way. For example a few months ago, Lower Extremity Review covered it this way: The rise and fall of minimalist […]

Continue Reading 2

Prescribing Running Shoes Based on Arch Height

I think we have known for a while that the data supporting a prescribing of running shoes based on the “pronation” paradigm is either lacking evidence or not supported, not withstanding the largely superficial understanding of the concepts and the superficial interpretation of the various studies and their implications. Some of the studies on this […]

Continue Reading 2