No, No …. and … ummm, NO!


Only a short post today as my head hurts from the facepalm. I have a lot of stuff that turns up in my daily alerts. Some of it good, some of it bad and some of it really hurts my head:

Distribution of plantar pressure during jogging barefoot or in minimalistic shoes in people who used to run in cushioned shoes.
Szulc P, Waszak M, Bartkowiak M, Bartkowiak P, Tomczak M, Boch-Kmieciak J, Cieślik K
J Sports Med Phys Fitness. 2017 May;57(5):565-571. doi: 10.23736/S0022-4707.16.06183-1
BACKGROUND:
In recent years, an increasing number of runners prefer jogging barefoot or in minimalistic shoes. The aim of this study was to compare the distribution of plantar pressure during jogging barefoot, in minimalistic shoes, or in shoes with cushioned soles, as these forces modulate the risk of injury.
METHODS:
The study included nine men aged between 24 and 25 years, who engaged in long-distance running. The plantar pressure of three foot zones (forefoot, midfoot, and hindfoot) was examined with WIN-POD electronic podometer during running barefoot, in minimalistic shoes, or in shoes with cushioned soles.
RESULTS:
Individuals who ran barefoot showed the greatest forefoot pressure, followed by those running in minimalistic shoes and cushioned shoes. In contrast, the heel pressure in individuals running in cushioned shoes was significantly greater than in those using minimalistic shoes or running barefoot.
CONCLUSIONS:
Switching from running in cushioned shoes to jogging barefoot is associated with the accumulation of greatest pressure in the forefoot and midfoot. The accumulation of the greatest pressure at the insertion of plantar aponeurosis can lead to the injuries of musculoskeletal system, in particular plantar aponeurositis. Even distribution of pressure among various parts of the foot in persons running in minimalistic shoes is associated with lower risk of injury than in the case of running barefoot.

Let’s just look at the conclusion:

Switching from running in cushioned shoes to jogging barefoot is associated with the accumulation of greatest pressure in the forefoot and midfoot.

Yes, that is what this study showed, though “accumulation” is probably not the best English word to use to describe the results.

The accumulation of the greatest pressure at the insertion of plantar aponeurosis can lead to the injuries of musculoskeletal system, in particular plantar aponeurositis.

No. The study was not on even injuries and no other study has shown that.

Even distribution of pressure among various parts of the foot in persons running in minimalistic shoes is associated with lower risk of injury than in the case of running barefoot.

No. The study was not even on injuries and no other study has shown that.

As always, I go where the evidence takes me until convinced otherwise …. next

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